ANNIE’S BACKGROUND

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ANNIE’S BACKGROUND

Zach:

Hey everyone. Welcome back to episode two of the Alpine Collective. I’m Zach, here with maestro of programing, Ian.

Ian:

Thank you. Thank you.

Zach:

And we’ve got Brett “Big Tricep” Barnes over here.

Brett Barnes:

[crosstalk 00:00:22].

Zach:

Physical therapist from Alpine PT and Performance. Today, we are pretty excited. We’ve got our first guest. Annie Brunner joining us on the show today.

Annie:

Yeah. Happy to be here. Thanks, guys.

Zach:

For anyone who doesn’t know Annie. Annie just give us a little bit of your professional and athletic background.

Annie:

Cool. I grew up– I played a lot of sports growing up, but soccer was my main sport. I still consider myself a hand sport athlete. So, I was a goalkeeper in soccer. I’m not very good on the field. My indoor team can attest to that. I played soccer my whole life, starting from age four, I think. Pre-preschool, basically when I could walk I started playing soccer. Played lacrosse, tennis and basketball, growing up with those. Then I specialized around eighth grade. From eighth grade through up in college and afterwards I played a little bit too. But always goalkeeper. Hand sports are my jam. And then up until now?

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Now I still compete in whatever comes up. I just like to have fun. If it’s CrossFit. CrossFit offers a lot of competition, which is why I heavily CrossFit right now. Spartan racing. I play tennis still quite a bit and still play soccer.

Zach:

What about your background professionally?

Annie:

Professionally, I graduated in 2013 from college. I played at CU and I went overseas to play in Switzerland for quite some time. Knee injury brought me back home and during the rehab process, I was playing for Western New York Flash as well. I kind of got back from that injury to play with those guys there. They’re now the NC Courage which is how people know them more famously I guess now.

Zach:

What do you do day to day? What’s your career?

Annie:

Day to day.

Ian:

[crosstalk 00:02:42]?

Annie:

I don’t know what comes first. I would say probably the thing I’m most accountable to now is I’m a landlord. I own the spot that Alpine is out of, so Alpine PT, Alpine CrossFit, and then we have a few more tenants outside of that. That’s probably my biggest responsibility. Then I own the gym. Ian does most of that. Thank God. My responsibilities are pretty light on the gym side. And then I help rep Fitness with product development.

Zach:

So you got a lot of free time.

Annie:

So much free time.

Ian:

You don’t know what to do with all that free time.

Annie:

Yeah. I don’t know what Netflix is. None of that.

Ian:

Fair enough.

Annie:

It’s good.

Ian:

We’re going to dig into your CrossFit for a little bit and then definitely go back to your injuries when you were a professional athlete. But I remember my first time ever seeing you was a partner competition at CrossFit MOB. I want to say three or four years ago.

Annie:

Oh, it was! Yeah. I was Rachel’s partner.

Ian:

Yes, absolutely. And I’m standing there. I was with Park Hill still at that time. And had a backwards hat on, a red sleeveless shirt, just doing burpee box jumps. The fastest I’ve ever seen. Like this is a bigger girl. She is moving.

First workout Ian saw me do…I still rocked the soccer shorts too

Annie:

Yes.

Ian:

Absolutely moving!

Annie:

3-2-1 Go! [inaudible 00:04:16]. That’s insane! Yeah, okay!

Ian:

So that’s the first time I remember seeing you.

Annie:

Yep!

Ian:

But how did you get into CrossFit? What happened with that?

Annie:

So, I got into crossfit almost right after graduation. I was up in Boulder. I graduated in December. So it put me in a weird time where I didn’t necessarily have the resources that I was looking for to go pro that were kind of consistent. The strength coach would have given me some time, but I mean they’ve got so many teams that training an individual to get ready to the next level. Just, for what it’s worth, it wasn’t a huge priority. But, the CrossFit gym, I was at Crossfit Sanitas. Was super stoked to have me.

Annie:

So, at that time, Beau Dorning was there and he kind of became my strength coach. Got me ready for going over to Switzerland. So I think I spent like a month with them. It was pretty quick and dirty. And so that’s kind of how I started. I knew right away. I did. My first workout was “Helen”. Now, we talk about our first– I shit you not– sorry.

Ian:

That’s fine. That’s fine.

Annie:

My first class, Alyssa Schauer was in, and she could do pull ups. And, I was pissed that I couldn’t. So we were doing “Helen” or just like a kettlebell running pull up workout. And, I was convinced that I could beat anybody at any athletic endeavor. But, I don’t know.

Ian:

Not Alyssa.

Annie:

Yeah. Still can’t be her, could never beat her.

Ian:

She’s very good.

Annie:

Some things never change.

Ian:

She’s very, very good. So that’s how you started CrossFit. What’s your relationship with Crossfit right now? I know you, obviously, I know you’re a gym owner.

Annie:

Yep!

Ian:

I’ve been on a few teams with you.

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

Very strong. Let’s talk about that.

Annie:

Coaching for my alma mater, University of Colorado

So I dove once I had my professional career, which kind of tabled CrossFit for a while. And then once I started coaching soccer, I really got into pushing myself in the gym. So CrossFit resume, it actually started off very weight lifting focused. I ended up getting my OCW level 2, so I was kind of more in the weightlifting track. Do you want, like? I mean, I don’t know. Yeah. Like I said, I’m pretty strong, but I’m terrible at gymnastics.

The start of my college coaching career at Troy State

Ian:

You’ve gotten better. You’ve gotten better for sure.

Annie:

So I’m getting much better.

Zach:

Tell us some of the comps you’ve been in. Because I know I’ve seen you at Turkey Challenge.

Annie:

Turkey Challenge.

Zach:

You were at South Fit.

Sanctionals, Argentina 2019

Annie: Yeah, I went to a sanctional. I dropped into Rx because those Pro girls are way too good. I would say some of my best, like back when I was coaching, my Sanitas team took third at Turkey Challenge. That was probably one of our better showings.

My Sanitas’ Team

Annie:

Decent spartan racer too. So I would say right now I didn’t know that crossfitters could be so good. So I’ve been focusing way more on endurance than strength. Cause I’m sure you can medal a lot easier in spartan racing. Spartan racing, we still love you. That’s not too easy. It’s just right. It’s perfect. Don’t ever change.

Ian:

Don’t ever change. You have a handful of Spartan racers at your gym. They’re not just Spartan racers, but nationally, worldwide. Just like, wow.

Steve and I took first in our age group this past summer in Snowmass. Megan got second…Steve trains with me at 6:30 and is 10th in the World in his age group.

Annie:

Just today, Steve told me that you have to, every time you move weight, he plate pinches his weights too.

Zach:

Yeah, I’ve seen him jump up and just hang on the rings for extraordinary amounts of time. It’s not fair.

Annie:

Yeah, yeah.

Zach:

Where, I can barely hold myself on two rings. They’re just like one arm, one ring. Yeah those guys are insane.

Annie with “those guys”–Dominic, Garik, and Steve.

Annie:

Yeah, those guys are like next level They got the season pass. Maybe one day. Much better.

Zach:

Take us into the, I mean, I’m interested to hear a little bit about, this injury history. I’ve-

Annie:

Definitely.

Zach:

As Annie’s PT, I’ve heard the whole gamut, but I think we’d be a little interested to hear the back stories here.

Annie:

Yeah. So, Zach is my PT and I’m finally to a point I think where I don’t have any nagging injuries, which I never thought I would say. So that’s pretty cool.

Ian:

Knock on wood.

Annie:

I know, knock on wood. No nagging injuries. But, as entrenched in soccer as I was, I exposed myself to a lot of risks, I think. So I tore my ACL in, I guess, is that 2006, or so. I was a junior in high school and it was the state finals. Tore my ACL there. Rehab, no problem. I thought, but I grew a big Cyclops legion. Had to get that out cause I couldn’t, I didn’t have any range of motion. There was so much scar tissue in there.

Annie:

I kind of lose track of all of the history, but down a few rabbit holes. My latest knee surgery was two years ago. I tore the root out on my meniscus. And that was kind of just like between my coaching career and going like way too hard at CrossFit. My meniscus root tore out somewhere in there. That surgery put me on my ass. That was almost harder that the ACL surgery.

Annie:

And before that, that’s kind of all my knee history. I had really, really bad thoracic outlet syndrome. Developed that sophomore year. Just from all the diving. The impact was, the impact just… I couldn’t feel my hands. I couldn’t write. I couldn’t open doors. So I PT’d for four years and then went in and got like a brachial Plex surgery that tried to free up those nerves a little bit, which helped. And then, yeah.

Zach:

Can we talk about your knee infection and flying back from Europe?

Annie:

That was one of them, yeah. So I was playing for SE Neunkirch over in Switzerland. Decent team, but we train on like ground up concrete.

Zach:

Oh, geez.

Annie:

Yes. Like if you were to watch the Alpine parking lot right now it’s not. It was literally not far from that. And I mean you kind of have to dive as a goalkeeper. So I was, I would dive on that and my knee got so infected. It was ginormous. I mean for those of you who aren’t listening are, aren’t watching. I just probably four times the size, a normal knee. And, they didn’t know what to do. We didn’t speak the same language. So they just sent me home.

Brett Barnes:

[crosstalk 00:12:01]

Annie:

I landed and I was in surgery I think like 10 hours after. My mom went to high school with Andy Moats. Surgeon, knee surgeon around here. And he came in on a Sunday morning and was like… You got to… Let’s do this. So yeah, they took out of my a bursa.

Ian:

Really. They took that out?

Annie:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, that was crazy.

Zach:

I’m kind of interested to, I don’t know– I guess as a PT. I don’t think the kind of a PT I do… It’s different from like normal PT.

Annie:

Yeah, way different.

Zach:

But I guess can you explain a little bit about you felt. Like how it was different. Like kind of more performance based PT versus like, I don’t know, beige office buildings.

Annie:

Right? It’s definitely changing the paradigm. So I rehab– You rehabbed my root repair probably, but we didn’t start told him was a year after?

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Because I was convinced that I’ve been through enough PT that I knew what I was doing. But, I still just needed the accountability. And so, I made Zach train meet once a week.

Zach:

Once a week.

Annie:

Okay. So how has the paradigm shifting? Before, you would go in and I knew the exact routine. He’d heat up to the knee, put it through a range of motion, you maybe do some strength exercises, and then you ice the knee and stim your quad. And it’s like, okay, all of that took an hour of somehow. I feel like ice and stim and heat was a half an hour of it, probably more. And it wasn’t challenging. It was just like some basic exercises. Never got my heart rate up. Was never sweating. So I was like, I would say I was almost resistant when I was first started working with Zach cause it’s like freaking hard.

Ian:

It is. It’s hard stuff.

Annie:

And that’s when I really started to learn that injuries don’t have to be super restricting and confining because we worked so hard. The workouts were some of the hardest workouts. And I told him I thought I was going to cry one time.

Me rehabbing with Zach

Zach:

I think you did cry one time! I’m pretty sure we have footage of-

Annie:

Yeah, we have that saved somewhere.

Zach:

Look for a video. Alpine. There might be a video.

Annie:

There’s a video out there of him torturing me. And it was so cool. It was challenging. We were progressing. I was some of the most fit– that was going into Turkish challenge last year. Which I placed pretty well as an individual.

Ian:

You did. You did. I remember that. You did very well.

Annie:

Yeah. And before that I wasn’t jumping.

Ian:

Yeah [inaudible 00:15:05].

Annie:

Yeah I think I took sixth or something like random. I was one place below Megan.

Ian:

Yeah, it was.

Zach:

[crosstalk 00:15:20].

Ian:

That’s the Megan Marquis, by the way.

Zach:

Regionals athlete. Megan Marquis.

Ian:

Regionals. Sanctional. Probably should qualify for the games but we won’t talk about that. As someone who doesn’t know as much about, you know, physical therapy and all that. I don’t have the degree, I don’t have that master’s [inaudible 00:15:27]. With her knee surgery and the rehab that she did and the rehab you did. What would you say for both of your guys views? Like, what’s different? Like the game changer and all of that? Cause like you said, you were saying that like his style is very much so different. Let’s get into that.

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Yeah. I think that’d be-

Zach:

Do you want to? Yeah, I mean, I don’t know. I think I approach rehab very differently in that I think everyone deserves the right to move. And I think everyone deserves the right to do what they want to do. And I think taking someone’s goal and working together with them to achieve that. I mean I unfortunately see a lot of PTs who just like, they get their goal in mind and then that’s where they stop. You know, like, “Hey, I want you to be able to do stairs.” And it’s like, well they won’t be able to run an ultra, there’s probably going to be a disconnect here. And the PT is like, “well if they can do stairs, like you know, that’s pretty good.”

Zach:

And that’s not a knock on all PTs. I’m not saying a lot of them do that, like Brett’s an awesome PT. He doesn’t see that stuff either. But I think given my background with strength and conditioning and coaching and all that. I just, I’ve always taken kind of a view where I think the body has the ability to adapt to the stresses put upon it. As long as they’re done in the correct order and progressed at the right rate and done in a controlled manner. And I think, I just, me and Annie would set goals and we’d be like, we’re going to crush this. Like, hey, next week, we’re going to do 30 inch box jumps. You know? But we didn’t start there. You know, we started with working on hopping on the ground.

Annie:

We legit did. We did like 12 inch box.

Zach:

Yeah. I remember I’d watch Annie jump and like there was just a lot of stuff that was kind of funky that we needed to fix. And I was like, has anyone watched you jump? Didn’t you jump in PT? Nope. [inaudible 00:17:30] I’ve always taken that as a PT. You need to watch someone move. Like you can have the strongest quads in the world, but if you don’t know how to use your body, that’s not usable, you know? So-

Annie:

There’s more learning for sure.

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

You don’t, he’ll put you through the movement and a mild manner and then you’re learning how to do it. And then similar to kind of like a cross fit mentality, let’s get the mechanics. Let’s get it consistent and then he will freaking add intensity.

Zach:

Yeah. Yeah. And I think that’s where the fun came in. We would have an hour together. And so we usually spend the first 20 minutes just focusing on mechanics of one part or the other. And we, basically screen her every week, you know? Just like, hey, let’s run through everything. Let’s see where we’re having issues. If we had to do some soft tissue work or some manual therapy, cool, we would jump into that, address it, and then would immediately use it. And that’s where I think the magic really happens is using it. You know, I think people get excited to get a little massage or something. Then they just want to chill after. But that’s not how you keep that stuff.

Zach:

So we would kind of screen her and then we would go over mechanics and then we would take stuff that we had previously kind of mastered the mechanics on and I would just mastermind that into a workout that would allow Annie to feel really challenged and would be really productive, but it would all be in a safe manner. And I think that’s where the biggest difference kind of comes is that some of those workouts were kind of-

Annie:

Yeah, we’ll link some of them in the YouTube video or in the podcast.

Zach:

They were not easy work– Sometimes I look at them and

[inaudible 00:19:28]

. The nice part is, throughout the whole thing, I could watch her move and then see her move under fatigue. So we could watch her as things, as she would get more and more tired. What happened during mechanics? And then I could take that the next week and say, “Okay, now, I’ve seen that even under fatigue she can jump and land well, but I noticed that as she squats, we’re still deviating away from the injured side as she gets more and more tired.” So it’s not a load thing. It’s an endurance thing. So then we need to work on that. So I think that that’s a big thing too, is as you watch people move, you’ve got to make these mental notes and then correct it. So that was kind of the nice part of having a whole hour. Just one on one and being able to focus on all that. Yeah, I think that was kind of my-

Annie:

Yeah. I made huge gains. I mean, before I started with Zach, I wasn’t running. I wasn’t jumping. I would sometimes jump rope. Now, I’m doing, we made the 30 inch box. I thought I was being funny. I was like, “Well let’s make my goal 30 inch box jumps.” Which thank God we did, cause we had to do that around Thanksgiving.

Zach:

Yeah, it’s funny I remember. It was cool too to like give… And this is a testament to Annie’s work ethic. But it was nice, cause I’d give her homework and then she’d walk by me in the gym and she’d be like, “Oh, I did 26 inches the other day.” I’d be like “Aw Yeah!” It helps to have somebody who works hard on the outside, for sure. But I think that’s been one of the cool things now about being attached to the gym is that we get to work with cool folks like this who will just… It doesn’t have to be a traditional PT. Like, “Oh come see me twice a week for blah, blah, blah.”

Zach:

Don’t get me wrong, there’s times like postsurgical where that’s important. You need that. But here we can really see someone and be like, “Okay, you have your homework, you’re accountable, you’re responsible and you know how to do all this.” It’s kind of up to you now and then we’ll check in when it’s appropriate and get you progressed. It’s been a really cool opportunity to be, be a part of the gym with you guys cause it’s been fun to work with Ian. Ian, the program is awesome. And then we’ve been able to work together on warm ups to prevent injuries. My goal is to put Brett and I out of business. We hope that there’s no more injuries. So that’s our goal.

Brett Barnes:

That’s the goal! [crosstalk 00:21:55]

Ian:

I mean from the programming standpoint, it’s a complete game changer. With having warm ups that you all a hundred percent can trust and know that we’re snatching overhead today. All right, but what do I need to do to make sure your shoulders are set and their traps are actually being used? And it’s not just like those deltoids and those triceps and your upper traps. We really need those mid traps to be involved. It’s just knowing that like he’s made this and the next step then is not just me being like, “Hey do this, but now I have the knowledge.” Cause if I have the knowledge as a coach and gain from him, I can then give it to my athletes. Which that’s the biggest game changer. Knowledge is the biggest power that we have. And then all of life when it comes to nutrition and anything.

Ian:

You want to make sure that she learns how to move properly under the most fatigue. And so then I know that. I know what you want my members to know and so that I can tell them. And that makes Alpine so different community in a sense.

Annie:

Yeah, there’s been such a huge shift. And everybody’s got their different hard fast… If you bring up a warm up in the CrossFit community, everybody’s got such a hard fast opinion. The coach should be knowledgeable enough to get the athlete ready for the workout. But when it comes to us, we don’t have to leave anything to chance.

Ian:

Nope.

Annie:

Zach, and you guys, I mean you have your doctorates, you have your CSCS. And with us being like, “Hey, we don’t really have anything to chance. We trust you to do the warm up.” I mean our injury rates have been so much better. Not that we expose people to much injury, but the nagging little shoulder tweaks or whatever. They’re much, much, much better.

Brett Barnes:

It’s been fun to see. It’s been fun to see for sure.

Annie:

So I’d say any affiliates out there. If you program for yourselves, send these guys your programming. Cause your members will definitely thank you.

Zach:

So, Annie, what’s the future hold for you? What’s the real future?

Annie:

That’s interesting. I want to keep growing. I think what we’ve got going on is infectious. Like people, their quality of life is improved. It’s fun. We have a really good community. And I think the more people that we can bring into this community… We’ll just make the front range and everybody’s so much happier. So I think we can still extend our reach. Whether that’s just us dropping a cool event or something that more people can bring their friends to whatever. I’m not done growing the gym. We brought on a community advocate and an assistant coach, that’s Ben. And his basic role is to make us bigger. While we’re making this bigger, holding that culture, and I guess, I don’t know what else… But just making sure that culture is ingrained into every athlete that comes in is huge. Yeah. So extending our reach.

Annie:

So right now it’s like all right, we want to extend our reach on the front range and once we extend our reach on the front range, you know Ian’s got contacts literally across the world. So, hey! Let’s extend our range to like Sri Lanka, all these other areas that are kind of like just starting to understand CrossFit. Like let’s get the best program in the world and in their hands. I think that’s kind of where we see it going.

Ian:

Yeah, we definitely want that outer reach. Not just the front range but like get out there. And like you mentioned, briefly there, Sri Lanka specifically just cause I have athletes there. There CrossFit is probably five to seven years behind where the United States is right now. And it’s just getting that huge boom that we saw in 2014.

Annie:

For sure.

Ian:

And so, now that we have a partnership with sugar water and everything, it makes it a lot easier for us to spread what we know. As you know, with your physical therapy, with my programming, with Annie’s business knowledge, just to try to help out and guide people in the way that we see as fitting for sure. And building that community. One hundred percent.

Ian:

I’ve been at Alpine for three years now.

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

It’s never been this big.

Annie:

Never been this big. Never been this cohesive. And I think you guys kind of feel it too. This community is just different. We really do life together.

Our Sunday Crew

Brett Barnes:

Yeah, it’s real cool.

Zach:

Sunday mountain bike-

Annie:

Sunday mountain bike club, Sunday Superbowl-

Ian:

That’s coming up.

Annie:

That’s coming up!

Zach:

Can we give previews of future… I’ve heard rumors of paint balling. Maybe-

Annie:

Yeah, paintballing. White river rafting.

Zach:

Yeah, that was a good time. We didn’t lose anyone.

Annie:

Yep.

Brett Barnes:

That’s always a plus.

Ian:

Terrifying!

Annie:

We were worried there. [inaudible 00:27:23]

Ian:

There was a mountain biking trip, wasn’t there?

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

The party that didn’t end too well.

Annie:

See, they get hurt outside the gym. [crosstalk 00:27:41].

Zach:

We don’t give the warm ups for mountain biking and other things. We just do the work outs.

Annie:

I feel like we should talk about business a little bit.

Ian:

I agree. We should go into that because we’re doing something very different.

Annie:

Yeah! You guys are attached to us.

Ian:

Literally.

Annie:

I think it will be cool for affiliate owners out there, too. I mean they’re always trying to expand their services. Like see what’s successful out there. Like first off, I think it takes a lot of guts to be like, these guys both have full time jobs. So to just be like, all right, you know, we believe in this approach so much. Which as you guys get to know us, I think you’ll kind of see how their approach is different. And it really does take that break away from the norm to get more attraction in this approach. And you guys freaking took that step. So when did, when were you like, all right, let’s do this? Let’s quit our jobs. The time is now!

Ian:

Can we talk about how Annie just became the host of our podcast!

.

Annie:

I want to know you guys because we haven’t really gotten into this!

Zach:

Today, it’s the Alpine podcast hosted by Annie! I think it was probably like mid October-

Brett Barnes:

Something like that. I think we were talking about opening up a clinic together since we graduated. But it was something that was like kind of like, you know, is this really going to happen any time soon type of thing. And so yeah, October/ November kind of rolls around and I get this whole ball started rolling a little bit. It became real!

Zach:

Yeah, Annie came and said, “Hey I have a spot, would you want to open a clinic?” And it was kind of like well now or never I guess. I’d been working at Alpine for over a year but it was kind of limited hours cause I would work outside my full time job. So I knew that we could have a lot of fun here and have a big impact here. And it would be a unique model and then Annie showed me the spot and I was like yeah this is definitely it. But luckily Brett was brave enough to come along with me. I kind of looked at it and I was like, this looks super cool but I’m thinking I want somebody else who’s like-minded to come with me. And so luckily, Brett and I went to school together and we kind of have similar mind thoughts there. And then he was also a college football player and he’s been doing it. Anyone who’s not watching right now, Brett’s [inaudible 00:30:22] are huge. So he’s, he’s trained a lot. So yeah.

Brett Barnes:

Well, one of the things that I really enjoyed and kind of won me over into this thing was, like you said, is the community here. Knowing that we had a nice support group literally right next door and that we could kind of get this newer model going and we have people that we can work with. I think really we can become very successful. I think that’s huge.

Zach:

Yeah. For any affiliates out there who are looking to do it. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out and we’ll be happy to talk with you. But I think it’s been really cool too because it’s such a symbiotic relationship. Like it’s so nice to be able to go over to Ian or you or be like, “Hey, we worked with so and so, and this is what’s going on. Like we need to limit this and this. But don’t let him slack on the other stuff. It’s going to be good for them to move. They need to be in here doing stuff.” So finding ways to make sure that members can still safely move. It’s good for the business. It’s good for our community here, cause people still want come work out and then it’s good for us cause we need to help people.

Zach:

So its awesome cause its kind of like everyone wins. And luckily you guys are so awesome in terms of like the coaches. They respect us so much and that we respect them so much. Everyone just works together for a common goal. There’s no egos here. That’s one of the biggest things that I found awesome. Is that like initially when I graduated from PT school I went to a couple different gyms and I tried to help out there and there were definitely some ego issues. Of like running into some coaches who thought that I know enough, we don’t need your help. It kind of sucked because it’s like man I’m just trying to help you guys out. You know, like we just want to. So that’s one of the greatest thing here too is you guys have such an awesome staff and everyone’s like really respectful of each other.

Annie:

That’s what these guys kind of know, but I have a very tight circle of trust. I think I learned that from my time in the soccer world. So when Ian and Zach got in. They were in. [crosstalk 00:32:40]

Zach:

Two years in and Annie was like, “Let me share a secret, my favorite color is orange.” And Brett day one showed up and she was like, “Do you need to know my social security number?

Ian:

I had to quit my full time job to get into the circle of trust.

Annie:

Yeah, Ian quit his full time job to go full time programming, full time coaching. And I was like, yep. When our other head coach left. I was, I wasn’t going to let Ian go anywhere, so I apologize to Oracle.

Ian:

Don’t apologize.

Annie:

I stole your head coach. Sorry about that.

Ian:

So for those who don’t know, I worked in corporate America for about a year and a half, two years as a full time fitness specialist up in Broomfield. And they actually had a CrossFit, the two CrossFit gyms there and I had my benefits. I was on salary, like everything was okay. That was fine. But then my roommate at the time, the head coach of Alpine was moving back to Missouri and I’m just like, “My heart wants to do this instead.” And I reminded myself a couple of years before that I quit my manufacturing and engineering job to do fitness full time again. So, all right Ian, you’re going to do this one more time. Let’s make this work.

Annie:

Seriously, it takes a lot of guts to… I mean you guys all three did the same thing.

Zach:

Didn’t you do that with a gym?

Annie:

I mean I guess we all did that! So, I think that’s like the biggest part that is making us successful is we see comfort and we’re just not okay with it.

Ian:

No, we’re not okay with it.

Annie:

Right, let’s keep pushing this thing. Yeah, we’ll be comfortable when we… I guess, I guess when we maybe die. Maybe we’ll learn what Netflix, is then.

Zach:

Maybe then, yeah! Yeah, we were comfortable being uncomfortable.

Annie:

Yeah, totally.

Zach:

But hey, it’s making some awesome stuff here, so. Well, Annie. We just want to say thank you so much for coming on.

Annie:

Thanks for having me.

Zach:

We’re really looking forward to bring in a lot of content to all the listeners out there. We’re going to have a lot of exciting stuff coming out, fitness stories. We’re going to go over programming and how that’s done with Ian. We’re going to have some injury, like how to train around, how to work through, how to get back. We got a lot of exciting stuff coming forward. I don’t want to give too much away, but we have a pretty international pro level awesome athlete.

Annie:

That’s coming up.

Zach:

That’s our teaser.

Ian:

Yeah, like the top level.

Zach:

Yeah, so I’m pretty excited to keep sharing stuff. Please be sure to like, subscribe, rate, review, all that fun stuff and we’ll talk to you next time.

Zach:

Hey everyone. Welcome back to episode two of the Alpine Collective. I’m Zach, here with maestro of programing, Ian.

Ian:

Thank you. Thank you.

Zach:

And we’ve got Brett “Big Tricep” Barnes over here.

Brett Barnes:

[crosstalk 00:00:22].

Zach:

Physical therapist from Alpine PT and Performance. Today, we are pretty excited. We’ve got our first guest. Andy Brunner joining us on the show today.

Annie:

Yeah. Happy to be here. Thanks, guys.

Zach:

For anyone who doesn’t know Annie. Annie just give us a little bit of your professional and athletic background.

Annie:

Cool. I grew up– I played a lot of sports growing up, but soccer was my main sport. I still consider myself a hand sport athlete. So, I was a goalkeeper in soccer. I’m not very good on the field. My indoor team can attest to that. I played soccer my whole life, starting from age four, I think. Pre-preschool, basically when I could walk I started playing soccer. Played lacrosse, tennis and basketball, growing up with those. Then I specialized around eighth grade. From eighth grade through up in college and afterwards I played a little bit too. But always goalkeeper. Hand sports are my jam. And then up until now?

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Now I still compete in whatever comes up. I just like to have fun. If it’s CrossFit. CrossFit offers a lot of competition, which is why I heavily CrossFit right now. Spartan racing. I play tennis still quite a bit and still play soccer.

Zach:

What about your background professionally?

Annie:

Professionally, I graduated in 2013 from college. I played at CU and I went overseas to play in Switzerland for quite some time. Knee injury brought me back home and during the rehab process, I was playing for Western New York Flash as well. I kind of got back from that injury to play with those guys there. They’re now the NC Courage which is how people know them more famously I guess now.

Zach:

What do you do day to day? What’s your career?

Annie:

Day to day.

Ian:

[crosstalk 00:02:42]?

Annie:

I don’t know what comes first. I would say probably the thing I’m most accountable to now is I’m a landlord. I own the spot that Alpine is out of, so Alpine PT, Alpine CrossFit, and then we have a few more tenants outside of that. That’s probably my biggest responsibility. Then I own the gym. Ian does most of that. Thank God. My responsibilities are pretty light on the gym side. And then I help rep Fitness with product development.

Zach:

So you got a lot of free time.

Annie:

So much free time.

Ian:

You don’t know what to do with all that free time.

Annie:

Yeah. I don’t know what Netflix is. None of that.

Ian:

Fair enough.

Annie:

It’s good.

Ian:

We’re going to dig into your CrossFit for a little bit and then definitely go back to your injuries when you were a professional athlete. But I remember my first time ever seeing you was a partner competition at CrossFit MOB. I want to say three or four years ago.

Annie:

Oh, it was! Yeah. I was Rachel’s partner.

Ian:

Yes, absolutely. And I’m standing there. I was with Park Hill still at that time. And had a backwards hat on, a red sleeveless shirt, just doing burpee box jumps. The fastest I’ve ever seen. Like this is a bigger girl. She is moving.

Annie:

Yes.

Ian:

Absolutely moving!

Annie:

3-2-1 Go! [inaudible 00:04:16]. That’s insane! Yeah, okay!

Ian:

So that’s the first time I remember seeing you.

Annie:

Yep!

Ian:

But how did you get into CrossFit? What happened with that?

Annie:

So, I got into crossfit almost right after graduation. I was up in Boulder. I graduated in December. So it put me in a weird time where I didn’t necessarily have the resources that I was looking for to go pro that were kind of consistent. The strength coach would have given me some time, but I mean they’ve got so many teams that training an individual to get ready to the next level. Just, for what it’s worth, it wasn’t a huge priority. But, the CrossFit gym, I was at Crossfit Sanitas. Was super stoked to have me.

Annie:

So, at that time, Beau Dorning was there and he kind of became my strength coach. Got me ready for going over to Switzerland. So I think I spent like a month with them. It was pretty quick and dirty. And so that’s kind of how I started. I knew right away. I did. My first workout was “Helen”. Now, we talk about our first– I shit you not– sorry.

Ian:

That’s fine. That’s fine.

Annie:

My first class, Alyssa Shower was in, and she could do pull ups. And, I was pissed that I couldn’t. So we were doing “Helen” or just like a kettlebell running pull up workout. And, I was convinced that I could beat anybody at any athletic endeavor. But, I don’t know.

Ian:

Not Alyssa.

Annie:

Yeah. Still can’t be her, could never beat her.

Ian:

She’s very good.

Annie:

Some things never change.

Ian:

She’s very, very good. So that’s how you started CrossFit. What’s your relationship with Crossfit right now? I know you, obviously, I know you’re a gym owner.

Annie:

Yep!

Ian:

I’ve been on a few teams with you.

Zach:

[inaudible 00:06:20].

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

Very strong. Let’s talk about that.

Annie:

So I dove once I had my professional career, which kind of tabled CrossFit for a while. And then once I started coaching soccer, I really got into pushing myself in the gym. So CrossFit resume, it actually started off very weight lifting focused. I ended up getting my OCW level 2, so I was kind of more in the weightlifting track. Do you want, like? I mean, I don’t know. Yeah. Like I said, I’m pretty strong, but I’m terrible at gymnastics.

Ian:

You’ve gotten better. You’ve gotten better for sure.

Annie:

So I’m getting much better.

Zach:

Tell us some of the comps you’ve been in. Because I know I’ve seen you at Turkey Challenge.

Annie:

Turkey Challenge.

Zach:

You were at South Fit.

Annie:

Yeah, I went to a sanctional. I dropped into [inaudible 00:07:22] those girls are way too good. I would say some of my best, like back when I was coaching, my Sanitas team took third at Turkey Challenge. That was probably one of our better showings.

Annie:

Decent spartan racer too. So I would say right now I didn’t know that crossers could be so good. So I’ve been focusing way more on endurance than strength. Cause I’m sure you can medal a lot easier in spartan racing. Spartan racing, we still love you. That’s not too easy. It’s just right. It’s perfect. Don’t ever change.

Ian:

Don’t ever change. You have a handful of Spartan racers at your gym. They’re not just Spartan racers, but nationally, worldwide [inaudible 00:08:17] . Just like, wow.

Annie:

Just today, Steve told me that you have to, every time you move away, he plate pinches his weights too. [inaudible 00:08:27]

Zach:

Yeah, I’ve seen him jump up and just hang on the rings for extraordinary amounts of time. It’s not fair.

Annie:

Yeah, yeah.

Zach:

Where, I can barely hold myself on two rings. They’re just like one arm, one ring. Yeah those guys are-

Annie:

Yeah, those guys are like next level They got the season pass. Maybe one day. Much better.

Zach:

Take us into the, I mean, I’m interested to hear a little bit about, this injury history. I’ve-

Annie:

Definitely.

Zach:

As Andy’s PT, I’ve heard the whole gamut, but I think we’d be a little interested to hear the back stories here.

Annie:

Yeah. So, Zach is my PT and I’m finally to a point I think where I don’t have any nagging injuries, which I never thought I would say. So that’s pretty cool.

Ian:

Knock on wood.

Annie:

I know, knock on wood. No nagging injuries. But, as entrenched in soccer as I was, I exposed myself to a lot of risks, I think. So I tore my ACL in, I guess, is that 2006, or so. I was a junior in high school and it was the state finals. Tore my ACL there. Rehab, no problem. I thought, but I grew a big Cyclops legion. Had to get that out cause I couldn’t, I didn’t have any range of motion. There was so much scar tissue in there.

Annie:

I kind of lose track of all of the history, but down a few rabbit holes. My latest knee surgery was two years ago. I tore the root out on my meniscus. And that was kind of just like between my coaching career and going like way too hard at CrossFit. My meniscus root tore out somewhere in there. That surgery put me on my ass. That was almost harder that the ACL surgery.

Annie:

And before that, that’s kind of all my knee history. I had really, really bad thoracic outlet syndrome. Developed that sophomore year. Just from all the diving. The impact was, the impact just… I couldn’t feel my hands. I couldn’t write. I couldn’t open doors. So I PT’d for four years and then went in and got like a brachial Plex surgery that tried to free up those nerves a little bit, which helped. And then, yeah.

Zach:

Can we talk about your knee infection and flying back from Europe?

Annie:

That was one of them, yeah. So I was playing for SE Neunkirch over in Switzerland. Decent team, but we train on like ground up concrete.

Zach:

Oh, geez.

Annie:

Yes. Like if you were to watch the Alpine parking lot right now it’s not. It was literally not far from that. And I mean you kind of have to dive as a goalkeeper. So I was, I would dive on that and my knee got so infected. It was ginormous. I mean for those of you who aren’t listening are, aren’t watching. I just probably four times the size, a normal knee. And, they didn’t know what to do. We didn’t speak the same language. So they just sent me home.

Brett Barnes:

[crosstalk 00:12:01]

Annie:

I landed and I was in surgery I think like 10 hours after. My mom went to high school with Andy Moats. Surgeon, knee surgeon around here. And he came in on a Sunday morning and was like… You got to… Let’s do this. So yeah, they took out of my a bursa.

Ian:

Really. They took that out?

Annie:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, that was crazy.

Zach:

I’m kind of interested to, I don’t know– I guess as a PT. I don’t think the kind of a PT I do… It’s different from like normal PT.

Annie:

Yeah, way different.

Zach:

But I guess can you explain a little bit about you felt. Like how it was different. Like kind of more performance based PT versus like, I don’t know, beige office buildings.

Annie:

Right? It’s definitely changing the paradigm. So I rehab– You rehabbed my root repair probably, but we didn’t start told him was a year after?

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Because I was convinced that I’ve been through enough PT that I knew what I was doing. But, I still just needed the accountability. And so, I made Zach train meet once a week.

Zach:

Once a week.

Annie:

Okay. So how has the paradigm shifting? Before, you would go in and I knew the exact routine. He’d heat up to the knee, put it through a range of motion, you maybe do some strength exercises, and then you ice the knee and stim your quad. And it’s like, okay, all of that took an hour of somehow. I feel like ice and stim and heat was a half an hour of it, probably more. And it wasn’t challenging. It was just like some basic exercises. Never got my heart rate up. Was never sweating. So I was like, I would say I was almost resistant when I was first started working with Zach cause it’s like freaking hard.

Ian:

It is. It’s hard stuff.

Annie:

And that’s when I really started to learn that injuries don’t have to be super restricting and confining because we worked so hard. The workouts were some of the hardest workouts. And I told him I thought I was going to cry one time.

Zach:

I think you did cry one time! I’m pretty sure we have footage of-

Annie:

Yeah, we have that saved somewhere.

Zach:

Look for a video. Alpine. There might be a video.

Annie:

There’s a video out there of him torturing me. And it was so cool. It was challenging. We were progressing. I was some of the most fit– that was going into Turkish challenge last year. Which I placed pretty well as an individual.

Ian:

You did. You did. I remember that. You did very well.

Annie:

Yeah. And before that I wasn’t jumping.

Ian:

Yeah [inaudible 00:15:05].

Annie:

Yeah I think I took sixth or something like random. I was one place below Megan.

Ian:

Yeah, it was.

Zach:

[crosstalk 00:15:20].

Ian:

That’s the Megan Marquis, by the way.

Zach:

Regionals athlete. Megan Marquis.

Ian:

Regionals. Sanctional. Probably should qualify for the games but we won’t talk about that. As someone who doesn’t know as much about, you know, physical therapy and all that. I don’t have the degree, I don’t have that master’s [inaudible 00:15:27]. With her knee surgery and the rehab that she did and the rehab you did. What would you say for both of your guys views? Like, what’s different? Like the game changer and all of that? Cause like you said, you were saying that like his style is very much so different. Let’s get into that.

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

Yeah. I think that’d be-

Zach:

Do you want to? Yeah, I mean, I don’t know. I think I approach rehab very differently in that I think everyone deserves the right to move. And I think everyone deserves the right to do what they want to do. And I think taking someone’s goal and working together with them to achieve that. I mean I unfortunately see a lot of PTs who just like, they get their goal in mind and then that’s where they stop. You know, like, “Hey, I want you to be able to do stairs.” And it’s like, well they won’t be able to run an ultra, there’s probably going to be a disconnect here. And the PT is like, “well if they can do stairs, like you know, that’s pretty good.”

Zach:

And that’s not a knock on all PTs. I’m not saying a lot of them do that, like Brett’s an awesome PT. He doesn’t see that stuff either. But I think given my background with strength and conditioning and coaching and all that. I just, I’ve always taken kind of a view where I think the body has the ability to adapt to the stresses put upon it. As long as they’re done in the correct order and progressed at the right rate and done in a controlled manner. And I think, I just, me and Annie would set goals and we’d be like, we’re going to crush this. Like, hey, next week, we’re going to do 30 inch box jumps. You know? But we didn’t start there. You know, we started with working on hopping on the ground.

Annie:

We legit did. We did like 12 inch box.

Zach:

Yeah. I remember I’d watch Annie jump and like there was just a lot of stuff that was kind of funky that we needed to fix. And I was like, has anyone watched you jump? Didn’t you jump in PT? Nope. [inaudible 00:17:30] I’ve always taken that as a PT. You need to watch someone move. Like you can have the strongest quads in the world, but if you don’t know how to use your body, that’s not usable, you know? So-

Annie:

There’s more learning for sure.

Zach:

Yeah.

Annie:

You don’t, he’ll put you through the movement and a mild manner and then you’re learning how to do it. And then similar to kind of like a cross fit mentality, let’s get the mechanics. Let’s get it consistent and then he will freaking add intensity.

Zach:

Yeah. Yeah. And I think that’s where the fun came in. We would have an hour together. And so we usually spend the first 20 minutes just focusing on mechanics of one part or the other. And we, basically screen her every week, you know? Just like, hey, let’s run through everything. Let’s see where we’re having issues. If we had to do some soft tissue work or some manual therapy, cool, we would jump into that, address it, and then would immediately use it. And that’s where I think the magic really happens is using it. You know, I think people get excited to get a little massage or something. Then they just want to chill after. But that’s not how you keep that stuff.

Zach:

So we would kind of screen her and then we would go over mechanics and then we would take stuff that we had previously kind of mastered the mechanics on and I would just mastermind that into a workout that would allow Annie to feel really challenged and would be really productive, but it would all be in a safe manner. And I think that’s where the biggest difference kind of comes is that some of those workouts were kind of-

Annie:

Yeah, we’ll link some of them in the YouTube video or in the podcast.

Zach:

They were not easy work– Sometimes I look at them and

[inaudible 00:19:28]

. The nice part is, throughout the whole thing, I could watch her move and then see her move under fatigue. So we could watch her as things, as she would get more and more tired. What happened during mechanics? And then I could take that the next week and say, “Okay, now, I’ve seen that even under fatigue she can jump and land well, but I noticed that as she squats, we’re still deviating away from the injured side as she gets more and more tired.” So it’s not a load thing. It’s an endurance thing. So then we need to work on that. So I think that that’s a big thing too, is as you watch people move, you’ve got to make these mental notes and then correct it. So that was kind of the nice part of having a whole hour. Just one on one and being able to focus on all that. Yeah, I think that was kind of my-

Annie:

Yeah. I made huge gains. I mean, before I started with Zach, I wasn’t running. I wasn’t jumping. I would sometimes jump rope. Now, I’m doing, we made the 30 inch box. I thought I was being funny. I was like, “Well let’s make my goal 30 inch box jumps.” Which thank God we did, cause we had to do that around Thanksgiving.

Zach:

Yeah, it’s funny I remember. It was cool too to like give… And this is a testament to Annie’s work ethic. But it was nice, cause I’d give her homework and then she’d walk by me in the gym and she’d be like, “Oh, I did 26 inches the other day.” I’d be like “Aw Yeah!” It helps to have somebody who works hard on the outside, for sure. But I think that’s been one of the cool things now about being attached to the gym is that we get to work with cool folks like this who will just… It doesn’t have to be a traditional PT. Like, “Oh come see me twice a week for blah, blah, blah.”

Zach:

Don’t get me wrong, there’s times like postsurgical where that’s important. You need that. But here we can really see someone and be like, “Okay, you have your homework, you’re accountable, you’re responsible and you know how to do all this.” It’s kind of up to you now and then we’ll check in when it’s appropriate and get you progressed. It’s been a really cool opportunity to be, be a part of the gym with you guys cause it’s been fun to work with Ian. Ian, the program is awesome. And then we’ve been able to work together on warm ups to prevent injuries. My goal is to put Brett and I out of business. We hope that there’s no more injuries. So that’s our goal.

Brett Barnes:

That’s the goal! [crosstalk 00:21:55]

Ian:

I mean from the programming standpoint, it’s a complete game changer. With having warm ups that you all a hundred percent can trust and know that we’re snatching overhead today. All right, but what do I need to do to make sure your shoulders are set and their traps are actually being used? And it’s not just like those deltoids and those triceps and your upper traps. We really need those mid traps to be involved. It’s just knowing that like he’s made this and the next step then is not just me being like, “Hey do this, but now I have the knowledge.” Cause if I have the knowledge as a coach and gain from him, I can then give it to my athletes. Which that’s the biggest game changer. Knowledge is the biggest power that we have. And then all of life when it comes to nutrition and anything.

Ian:

You want to make sure that she learns how to move properly under the most fatigue. And so then I know that. I know what you want my members to know and so that I can tell them. And that makes Alpine so different community in a sense.

Annie:

Yeah, there’s been such a huge shift. And everybody’s got their different hard fast… If you bring up a warm up in the CrossFit community, everybody’s got such a hard fast opinion. The coach should be knowledgeable enough to get the athlete ready for the workout. But when it comes to us, we don’t have to leave anything to chance.

Ian:

Nope.

Annie:

Zach, and you guys, I mean you have your doctorates, you have your CSCS. And with us being like, “Hey, we don’t really have anything to chance. We trust you to do the warm up.” I mean our injury rates have been so much better. Not that we expose people to much injury, but the nagging little shoulder tweaks or whatever. They’re much, much, much better.

Brett Barnes:

It’s been fun to see. It’s been fun to see for sure.

Annie:

So I’d say any affiliates out there. If you program for yourselves, send these guys your programming. Cause your members will definitely thank you.

Zach:

So, Annie, what’s the future hold for you? What’s the real future?

Annie:

That’s interesting. I want to keep growing. I think what we’ve got going on is infectious. Like people, their quality of life is improved. It’s fun. We have a really good community. And I think the more people that we can bring into this community… We’ll just make the front range and everybody’s so much happier. So I think we can still extend our reach. Whether that’s just us dropping a cool event or something that more people can bring their friends to whatever. I’m not done growing the gym. We brought on a community advocate and an assistant coach, that’s Ben. And his basic role is to make us bigger. While we’re making this bigger, holding that culture, and I guess, I don’t know what else… But just making sure that culture is ingrained into every athlete that comes in is huge. Yeah. So extending our reach.

Annie:

So right now it’s like all right, we want to extend our reach on the front range and once we extend our reach on the front range, you know Ian’s got contacts literally across the world. So, hey! Let’s extend our range to like Sri Lanka, all these other areas that are kind of like just starting to understand CrossFit. Like let’s get the best program in the world and in their hands. I think that’s kind of where we see it going.

Ian:

Yeah, we definitely want that outer reach. Not just the front range but like get out there. And like you mentioned, briefly there, Sri Lanka specifically just cause I have athletes there. There CrossFit is probably five to seven years behind where the United States is right now. And it’s just getting that huge boom that we saw in 2014.

Annie:

For sure.

Ian:

And so, now that we have a partnership with sugar water and everything, it makes it a lot easier for us to spread what we know. As you know, with your physical therapy, with my programming, with Annie’s business knowledge, just to try to help out and guide people in the way that we see as fitting for sure. And building that community. One hundred percent.

Ian:

I’ve been at Alpine for three years now.

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

It’s never been this big.

Annie:

Never been this big. Never been this cohesive. And I think you guys kind of feel it too. This community is just different. We really do life together.

Brett Barnes:

Yeah, it’s real cool.

Zach:

Sunday mountain bike-

Annie:

Sunday mountain bike club, Sunday Superbowl-

Ian:

That’s coming up.

Annie:

That’s coming up!

Zach:

Can we give previews of future… I’ve heard rumors of paint balling. Maybe-

Annie:

Yeah, paintballing. White river rafting.

Zach:

Yeah, that was a good time. We didn’t lose anyone.

Annie:

Yep.

Brett Barnes:

That’s always a plus.

Ian:

Terrifying!

Annie:

We were worried there. [inaudible 00:27:23]

Ian:

There was a mountain biking trip, wasn’t there?

Annie:

Yeah.

Ian:

The party that didn’t end too well.

Annie:

See, they get hurt outside the gym. [crosstalk 00:27:41].

Zach:

We don’t give the warm ups for mountain biking and other things. We just do the work outs.

Annie:

I feel like we should talk about business a little bit.

Ian:

I agree. We should go into that because we’re doing something very different.

Annie:

Yeah! You guys are attached to us.

Ian:

Literally.

Annie:

I think it will be cool for affiliate owners out there, too. I mean they’re always trying to expand their services. Like see what’s successful out there. Like first off, I think it takes a lot of guts to be like, these guys both have full time jobs. So to just be like, all right, you know, we believe in this approach so much. Which as you guys get to know us, I think you’ll kind of see how their approach is different. And it really does take that break away from the norm to get more attraction in this approach. And you guys freaking took that step. So when did, when were you like, all right, let’s do this? Let’s quit our jobs. The time is now!

Ian:

Can we talk about how Annie just became the host of our podcast!

[inaudible 00:28:55]

.

Annie:

I want to know you guys because we haven’t really gotten into this!

Zach:

Today, it’s the Alpine podcast hosted by Annie! I think it was probably like mid October-

Brett Barnes:

Something like that. I think we were talking about opening up a clinic together since we graduated. But it was something that was like kind of like, you know, is this really going to happen any time soon type of thing. And so yeah, October/ November kind of rolls around and I get this whole ball started rolling a little bit. It became real!

Zach:

Yeah, Annie came and said, “Hey I have a spot, would you want to open a clinic?” And it was kind of like well now or never I guess. I’d been working at Alpine for over a year but it was kind of limited hours cause I would work outside my full time job. So I knew that we could have a lot of fun here and have a big impact here. And it would be a unique model and then Annie showed me the spot and I was like yeah this is definitely it. But luckily Brett was brave enough to come along with me. I kind of looked at it and I was like, this looks super cool but I’m thinking I want somebody else who’s like-minded to come with me. And so luckily, Brett and I went to school together and we kind of have similar mind thoughts there. And then he was also a college football player and he’s been doing it. Anyone who’s not watching right now, Brett’s [inaudible 00:30:22] are huge. So he’s, he’s trained a lot. So yeah.

Brett Barnes:

Well, one of the things that I really enjoyed and kind of won me over into this thing was, like you said, is the community here. Knowing that we had a nice support group literally right next door and that we could kind of get this newer model going and we have people that we can work with. I think really we can become very successful. I think that’s huge.

Zach:

Yeah. For any affiliates out there who are looking to do it. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out and we’ll be happy to talk with you. But I think it’s been really cool too because it’s such a symbiotic relationship. Like it’s so nice to be able to go over to Ian or you or be like, “Hey, we worked with so and so, and this is what’s going on. Like we need to limit this and this. But don’t let him slack on the other stuff. It’s going to be good for them to move. They need to be in here doing stuff.” So finding ways to make sure that members can still safely move. It’s good for the business. It’s good for our community here, cause people still want come work out and then it’s good for us cause we need to help people.

Zach:

So its awesome cause its kind of like everyone wins. And luckily you guys are so awesome in terms of like the coaches. They respect us so much and that we respect them so much. Everyone just works together for a common goal. There’s no egos here. That’s one of the biggest things that I found awesome. Is that like initially when I graduated from PT school I went to a couple different gyms and I tried to help out there and there were definitely some ego issues. Of like running into some coaches who thought that I know enough, we don’t need your help. It kind of sucked because it’s like man I’m just trying to help you guys out. You know, like we just want to. So that’s one of the greatest thing here too is you guys have such an awesome staff and everyone’s like really respectful of each other.

Annie:

That’s what these guys kind of know, but I have a very tight circle of trust. I think I learned that from my time in the soccer world. So when Ian and Zach got in. They were in. [crosstalk 00:32:40]

Zach:

Two years in and Annie was like, “Let me share a secret, my favorite color is orange.” And Brett day one showed up and she was like, “Do you need to know my social security number?

Ian:

I had to quit my full time job to get into the circle of trust.

Annie:

Yeah, Ian quit his full time job to go full time programming, full time coaching. And I was like, yep. When our other head coach left. I was, I wasn’t going to let Ian go anywhere, so I apologize to Oracle.

Ian:

Don’t apologize.

Annie:

I stole your head coach. Sorry about that.

Ian:

So for those who don’t know, I worked in corporate America for about a year and a half, two years as a full time fitness specialist up in Broomfield. And they actually had a CrossFit, the two CrossFit gyms there and I had my benefits. I was on salary, like everything was okay. That was fine. But then my roommate at the time, the head coach of Alpine was moving back to Missouri and I’m just like, “My heart wants to do this instead.” And I reminded myself a couple of years before that I quit my manufacturing and engineering job to do fitness full time again. So, all right Ian, you’re going to do this one more time. Let’s make this work.

Annie:

Seriously, it takes a lot of guts to… I mean you guys all three did the same thing.

Zach:

Didn’t you do that with a gym?

Annie:

I mean I guess we all did that! So, I think that’s like the biggest part that is making us successful is we see comfort and we’re just not okay with it.

Ian:

No, we’re not okay with it.

Annie:

Right, let’s keep pushing this thing. Yeah, we’ll be comfortable when we… I guess, I guess when we maybe die. Maybe we’ll learn what Netflix, is then.

Zach:

Maybe then, yeah! Yeah, we were comfortable being uncomfortable.

Annie:

Yeah, totally.

Zach:

But hey, it’s making some awesome stuff here, so. Well, Annie. We just want to say thank you so much for coming on.

Annie:

Thanks for having me.

Zach:

We’re really looking forward to bring in a lot of content to all the listeners out there. We’re going to have a lot of exciting stuff coming out, fitness stories. We’re going to go over programming and how that’s done with Ian. We’re going to have some injury, like how to train around, how to work through, how to get back. We got a lot of exciting stuff coming forward. I don’t want to give too much away, but we have a pretty international pro level awesome athlete.

Annie:

That’s coming up.

Zach:

That’s our teaser.

Ian:

Yeah, like the top level.

Zach:

Yeah, so I’m pretty excited to keep sharing stuff. Please be sure to like, subscribe, rate, review, all that fun stuff and we’ll talk to you next time.

Yeah, so I’m pretty excited to keep sharing stuff. Please be sure to like, subscribe, rate, review, all that fun stuff and we’ll talk to you next time.

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